The Old Man of Storr

An Stòrr
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An Stòrr

Visiting the Old Man of Storr has become one of the must-do walks in Scotland in recent years and deservedly so. Despite its popularity, we advise caution. Although the distance is relatively short, the rock faces of the Storr are unstable. Avoid the areas immediately below the cliff and the Old Man of Storr.

The Old Man of Storr was once part of Trotternish Ridge, a 19-mile inland cliff created about 11,500 years ago which stretches north of here.

The Ridge is made of layers of rock – harder volcanic basalt rock on top, softer sandstone below. The hard rock presses down on the soft making it collapse and move.The Old Man of Storr is made up of harder basalt rock.

Thousands of years ago a major part of the Ridge detached from the cliff and is moving a few millimetres a year towards the sea.

It is the most dramatic and active landslip in Britain. Further north, near the Quiraing, the moving land is damaging the road. We expect the landscape will look very different in 5,000-8,000 years.

Important Information

  • Getting there

    Distance 4.5km/2.75 miles

    Time 2 hour return

    Grade Moderate walk. Map and compass. Warm, wind and waterproof clothing. Hillwalking boots. Remember the weather can change quickly here.

  • Safety Notice

    The drama of this landscape is both the scenery and the weather. Take care when you are exploring.

    Crofters graze their sheep here. Take care and please keep your dogs on a lead.

    A chàirdean, Coin ri bhith air teadhair. Tapadh leibh.

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